LUMBERTON — More than 100 pounds of raw marijuana and edible products, nearly 50 packets of heroin, over a pound of psychedelic mushrooms, and close to a quarter-million dollars in cash were seized as the result of an investigation into what the Burlington County Prosecutor's Office said was an illegal marijuana dispensary located in a Route 38 strip mall.

The prosecutor's office on Wednesday also disclosed the arrests of and charges against five people, identified as two owners and three employees of the retail store operating as Skraptyques, adjacent to a pizzeria, dance studio, and other businesses.

The marijuana edibles were sold in counterfeit packages, according to the prosecutor's office, resembling snack foods like Cheetos, Life Savers, Nerds, and Skittles.

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Prosecutor Scott Coffina said such packaging makes those cannabis products attractive and dangerous to children when brought into a home, and that the operations conducted inside Skraptyques breached the limits of what will eventually be New Jersey's legal recreational marijuana marketplace.

According to the prosecutor's office, the investigation found that customers entering Skraptyques would be scanned in by an armed guard and have their cell phones taken before being allowed access into a secure back room where the marijuana, edibles, and mushrooms were available via cash transaction.

Materials were seized from the business, the Mount Holly home of owners Mathew Quinn and Crystal Cain, a Mount Laurel storage facility, and four vehicles.

Mathew Quinn
Burlington County Prosecutor's Office
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Quinn, 44, was charged with first-degree possession of marijuana with intent to distribute, second-degree possession of psilocybin mushrooms with intent to distribute, second-degree conspiracy to distribute a controlled dangerous substance, and third-degree fortifying a controlled dangerous substance manufacturing or distribution facility.

Crystal Cain
Burlington County Prosecutor's Office
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Cain, 30, was charged with first-degree possession of marijuana with intent to distribute, second-degree possession of psilocybin mushrooms with intent to distribute, second-degree conspiracy to distribute a controlled dangerous substance, third-degree possession of heroin, third-degree fortifying a controlled dangerous substance manufacturing or distribution facility, and a disorderly persons offense of possession of drug paraphernalia.

Marion Huff
Burlington County Prosecutor's Office
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Marion Huff, 26, of Florence was charged with first-degree possession of marijuana with intent to distribute and second-degree conspiracy to distribute a controlled dangerous substance.

Nicole Colley
Burlington County Prosecutor's Office
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Nicole Colley, 31, of Mount Holly was charged with first-degree possession of marijuana with intent to distribute, second-degree possession of psilocybin mushrooms, and second-degree conspiracy to distribute a controlled dangerous substance.

Perry Brown
Burlington County Prosecutor's Office
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Perry Brown, 55, of Morrisville, Pa., who prosecutors said provided security at the business, was in possession of a firearm at the time of his arrest and was charged with first-degree possession of marijuana with intent to distribute, second-degree conspiracy to distribute a controlled dangerous substance, second-degree unlawful possession of a weapon, second-degree possession of a firearm while committing a controlled dangerous substance crime, and fourth-degree possession of large capacity magazines.

All five people were taken into custody, then released following their initial court appearances.

Patrick Lavery is a reporter and anchor for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at patrick.lavery@townsquaremedia.com

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These are the best hiking spots in New Jersey

A trip to New Jersey doesn't have to be all about the beach. Our state has some incredible trails, waterfalls, and lakes to enjoy.

From the Pine Barrens to the Appalachian Trail to the hidden gems of New Jersey, you have plenty of options for a great hike. Hiking is such a great way to spend time outdoors and enjoy nature, plus it's a great workout.

Before you go out on the trails and explore some of our listeners' suggestions, I have some tips on hiking etiquette from the American Hiking Society.

If you are going downhill and run into an uphill hiker, step to the side and give the uphill hiker space. A hiker going uphill has the right of way unless they stop to catch their breath.

Always stay on the trail, you may see side paths, unless they are marked as an official trail, steer clear of them. By going off-trail you may cause damage to the ecosystems around the trail, the plants, and wildlife that live there.

You also do not want to disturb the wildlife you encounter, just keep your distance from the wildlife and continue hiking.

Bicyclists should yield to hikers and horses. Hikers should also yield to horses, but I’m not sure how many horses you will encounter on the trails in New Jersey.
If you are thinking of bringing your dog on your hike, they should be leashed, and make sure to clean up all pet waste.

Lastly, be mindful of the weather, if the trail is too muddy, it's probably best to save your hike for another day.

I asked our listeners for their suggestions of the best hiking spots in New Jersey, check out their suggestions:

Every NJ city and town's municipal tax bill, ranked

A little less than 30 cents of every $1 in property taxes charged in New Jersey support municipal services provided by cities, towns, townships, boroughs and villages. Statewide, the average municipal-only tax bill in 2021 was $2,725, but that varied widely from more than $13,000 in Tavistock to nothing in three townships. In addition to $9.22 billion in municipal purpose taxes, special taxing districts that in some places provide municipal services such as fire protection, garbage collection or economic development levied $323.8 million in 2021.

Update: NJ arrests in Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riot

A year later, more than 20 people from New Jersey have been charged with involvement in the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.