As the saying goes, the first step to recovery from addiction is to recognize that you have a problem.

I had an opportunity to speak with the associate director for intervention with Recovery Centers for America. Rob Strauber explained that many people abusing substances know that they have a problem but don't know how to change their circumstances.

This is where the folks at RCA come in to help. Starting with a call to 888-RECOVERY, friends and family members can get the process started to get their loved one the help they need.

A typical intervention starts with a conversation with one person, which leads to identifying 6-8 people close to the loved one in the battle. That's followed by letter writing so the intervention specialist can set up a "script" to make sure the focus of the meeting is to get the person into treatment immediately.

The good news is that according to Rob, 95% of the events result in a person going into treatment.

As the addiction and overdose numbers continue to rise in New Jersey and across the country, it's critical to support and empower the good people working hard to save lives. If you need help, please call 888-RECOVERY or visit recoverycentersofamerica.com

Listen to my conversation with Rob here:

The post above reflects the thoughts and observations of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Bill Spadea. Any opinions expressed are Bill's own. Bill Spadea is on the air weekdays from 6 to 10 a.m., talkin’ Jersey, taking your calls at 1-800-283-1015.

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