PLEASANTVILLE — City police want the public to help them identify a man accused of attacking a girl as she walked to school Thursday morning, and have stationed both marked and unmarked patrol cars near the scene.

The girl's age was not confirmed by police, according to NJ.com. Police described the man as older in age, wearing a mask, black work coat, tan work pants, and a tan hat with black trim.

Police said the assault took place around 7:40 a.m. Thursday, "in or near" the woods in the area of the 400 blocks of Brighton and Wellington avenues, the NJ.com report said.

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The girl's injuries were significant enough that she was brought to a hospital for treatment.

Extra patrols are being added during school arrival and dismissal, according to the report.

Brighton and Wellington avenues are located east of Route 9 and just north of the Atlantic City Expressway, with Pleasantville Middle School and Pleasantville High School situated on the other side of Route 9.

Pleasantville
Site of the alleged assault (red pin), with the middle and high schools to the west (Google Maps)
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Anyone with information can call Pleasantville police at 609-641-6100, email supervisor@pleasantvillepd.org, or submit a tip to crimestoppersatlantic.com.

Patrick Lavery is New Jersey 101.5's afternoon news anchor. Follow him on Twitter @plavery1015 or email patrick.lavery@townsquaremedia.com.

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