If you have never visited Washington Rock Park, you are missing out! This panoramic view was used by George Washington and allows us to overlook central NJ and the NYC skyline.

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Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
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Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
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You are able to see the Goethals Bridge, Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge and the Outerbridge Crossing.

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Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
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Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
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Additionally, you can see the Rutgers University New Brunswick campus and Rutgers SHI Stadium in Piscataway. 

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Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
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Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
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This spot is famous because General George Washington used this overlook to monitor troops led by the British in 1777 during the American Revolution. The British army was being led by General William Howard who was advancing his troops towards Westfield.

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Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
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Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
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Because of the oversight Washington had at the top of the mountain, he was able to strategically have his troops circle behind Howe’s troops and cut off their retreat.

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Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
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It’s on top of the first Watchung mountain in Green Brook, and it’s one of the oldest parks in New Jersey.

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Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
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Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
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There are plenty of picnic tables to enjoy a nice lunch outside while enjoying the view.

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Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
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There is also a short dirt trail through the woods that connects to a paved trail loop.

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Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
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The dirt trail is about 0.25 miles and the loop is about 0.3 milesLook for the orange markers on the trees to get on the dirt trail, it is slightly rocky.

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Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
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Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
Jordan Jansson/Townsquare Media
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The post above reflects the thoughts and observations of New Jersey 101.5's Jordan Jansson. Any opinions expressed are her own.
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These are the best hiking spots in New Jersey

A trip to New Jersey doesn't have to be all about the beach. Our state has some incredible trails, waterfalls, and lakes to enjoy.

From the Pine Barrens to the Appalachian Trail to the hidden gems of New Jersey, you have plenty of options for a great hike. Hiking is such a great way to spend time outdoors and enjoy nature, plus it's a great workout.

Before you go out on the trails and explore some of our listeners' suggestions, I have some tips on hiking etiquette from the American Hiking Society.

If you are going downhill and run into an uphill hiker, step to the side and give the uphill hiker space. A hiker going uphill has the right of way unless they stop to catch their breath.

Always stay on the trail, you may see side paths, unless they are marked as an official trail, steer clear of them. By going off-trail you may cause damage to the ecosystems around the trail, the plants, and wildlife that live there.

You also do not want to disturb the wildlife you encounter, just keep your distance from the wildlife and continue hiking.

Bicyclists should yield to hikers and horses. Hikers should also yield to horses, but I’m not sure how many horses you will encounter on the trails in New Jersey.
If you are thinking of bringing your dog on your hike, they should be leashed, and make sure to clean up all pet waste.

Lastly, be mindful of the weather, if the trail is too muddy, it's probably best to save your hike for another day.

I asked our listeners for their suggestions of the best hiking spots in New Jersey, check out their suggestions:

New Jersey's smallest towns by population

New Jersey's least populated municipalities, according to the 2020 Census. This list excludes Pine Valley, which would have been the third-smallest with 21 residents but voted to merge into Pine Hill at the start of 2022.