A Trenton man has been accused of intentionally running over and killing his girlfriend on a street in Hillside in December, Union County Prosecutor William Daniel announced Sunday.

Daaim J. Boykins, 40, has been charged with first-degree murder and second-degree possession of a weapon for unlawful purposes, stemming from the death of 36-year-old Schwnaire Jones, of Willingboro.

On Dec. 5 around 9:30 p.m., Hillside police responded to the area of 41 King Street in the Westminster section of the town and found Jones laying on the sidewalk, critically hurt after being hit by a car.

She was pronounced dead shortly after.

Daaim J. Boykins is accused of killing Schwnaire Jones in December (Essex County jail Campbell Funeral Chapel)
Daaim J. Boykins is accused of killing Schwnaire Jones in December (Essex County jail Campbell Funeral Chapel)
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Daniel credited Union County and Hillside law enforcement as well as the Mercer County Prosecutor’s Office and Trenton police for carrying out the investigation in tracking down Boykins.

Anyone with information about the case can contact Union County Prosecutor’s Office Homicide Task Force Sgt. Lamar Hartsfield at 908-451-1873, Homicide Task Force Officer Ariel Franjul at 908-347-2212 or Hillside Police Det. Jose Aguiar at 732-221-0910.

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