After two years of lockdowns, supply chain disruptions and working remotely, the physical workplace and the dynamic between employer and employee has changed.

What comes next for the future of work in New Jersey? There are lessons to be learned from both sides.

New Jersey 101.5 presents a special town hall on this important topic on Thursday, April 21, at 7 p.m.

New Jersey 101.5’s Eric Scott leads a panel of economists, business leaders, policy experts and business owners to explore how the workplace has changed after the pandemic. Scott and his guests will help businesses and workers navigate the “new normal” of a post-pandemic economy. From helping to hire and retain staff to guiding prospective employees on the best way to get what they want and need, the panel will offer insight and actionable items.

The program will feature:

— Michele Siekerka, president/CEO of New Jersey Business and Industry Association

— Peter Chen, senior policy analyst for New Jersey Policy Perspective

— Maria Heidkamp, senior researcher for Heldrich Center for Workforce Development.

— Jeff Vasser, executive director of New Jersey Division of Travel and Tourism

— Richard Singer, director of permanent placement services at Robert Half in NJ

— Kirk Ruoff of Turning Point Restaurant

— Kristin Fitzgerald of Six Flags Great Adventure

Scott and his guests will also answer live, call-in questions from listeners throughout the hour.

Online, the Town Hall will be streamed on Facebook Live, through our free app and on this webpage.

Get our free mobile app

LOOK: States With the Most New Small Businesses Per Capita

To find the top 20 states with the most new small businesses per capita, Simply Business analyzed the Census Bureau’s Business Formation Statistics from August 2020 to July 2021.

Every NJ city and town's municipal tax bill, ranked

A little less than 30 cents of every $1 in property taxes charged in New Jersey support municipal services provided by cities, towns, townships, boroughs and villages. Statewide, the average municipal-only tax bill in 2021 was $2,725, but that varied widely from more than $13,000 in Tavistock to nothing in three townships. In addition to $9.22 billion in municipal purpose taxes, special taxing districts that in some places provide municipal services such as fire protection, garbage collection or economic development levied $323.8 million in 2021.