Anyone who has lived or worked in central to northern New Jersey is well aware of the importance of the New Jersey portion of U.S. Route 22, as well as the impatience you experience while driving on it.

The road serves as a vital artery through Warren, Hunterdon, Somerset, Union, and Essex counties, ending in Newark.

Youtube, Jacques Le Coque
Youtube, Jacques Le Coque
loading...

Once you cover the 60.5 miles of Route 22 in New Jersey, you can take the highway all the way to Cincinnati, Ohio. But don't, because as you'll see, once you get outside of New Jersey, it looks as if the person who created the route was a 2-year-old trying to draw a straight line for the first time.

Wikipedia
Wikipedia
loading...

Because of how built up several stretches of the New Jersey portion of U.S. 22 are, the route is littered with nostalgia. Many of the department stores, restaurants, bars, and car dealers along the route that once served as landmarks in your youth have now seen their buildings change tenants, or were demolished altogether. But some have stood the test of time.

Youtube, Jacques Le Coque
Youtube, Jacques Le Coque
loading...
Youtube, Jacques Le Coque
Youtube, Jacques Le Coque
loading...

An up-and-coming band out of Stamford, Connecticut, has dug into the archives on New Jersey's behalf, and given us some great footage of what U.S. Route 22 looked like back in the early '80s. I should add, the song is pretty great, too. A big time '60s pop vibe.

The band is called Jacques Le Coque, and the song is called "Twenty Two," and New Jersey's U.S. 22 sign even made the cover.

Jacques Le Coque / Bandcamp
Jacques Le Coque / Bandcamp
loading...

See the music video below. And below that are a bunch of photos that may unlock some core NJ memories for you.

Do you recognize any of these businesses?

NJ's Route 22 circa 1984 — Do you recognize these businesses?

Thanks to a new music video for a song called "Twenty Two" by the band Jacques Le Coque, some great footage has surfaced of the NJ portion of U.S. 22, a vital artery through Warren, Hunterdon, Somerset, Union, and Essex counties.

The post above reflects the thoughts and observations of New Jersey 101.5 producer, writer, and host Joe Votruba. Any opinions expressed are his own.

Questions, corrections, or comments? Send Joe Votruba an email. Follow Joe on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Travel back in time to a colorized Atlantic City circa 1919

Atlantic City was once considered 'America's Playground,' one of the most popular destinations along the eastern seaboard. This video shows what the boardwalk looked like during its peak. These are some standout screengrabs.

Independently owned record stores in New Jersey

The methods in which we listen to music have taken many forms throughout the years, but vinyl is still a force to be reckoned with.