Get paid for doing nothing? Some would say that’s the job of a New Jersey legislator.

But I digress.

If you heard about the national cream cheese shortage then you’ve heard how many companies are having a hard time making cheesecakes for the holiday season since cream cheese is a big ingredient. It is all about supply chain issues, a common theme as the pandemic drags on.

Kraft Heinz is the parent company of Philadelphia brand cream cheese. They’ve maxed out production trying to meet demand and it still has not been enough.

What to do?

Some genius came up with this campaign. They are literally paying people to not use cream cheese in their holiday baking project. They created this ad to explain it.

Talk about making lemonade out of lemons.

To get the $20 you must visit SpreadTheFeeling.com beginning noon on Friday. 10,000 slots will be available to reserve Friday and another 8,000 on Saturday.

Once you reserve you have to submit a store receipt for a dessert ingredient or a dessert. The receipt must be dated from December 17 to December 24.

Those who receive a confirmation of their reservation will get a unique link to send in the receipt from December 28 to January 4. Then the digital awards will take two to four weeks to be sent.

Sound a little complicated? I guess no more complicated than trying to figure out what to put on a Jersey bagel now that cream cheese is out of the question.

Opinions expressed in the post above are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Jeff Deminski only.

You can now listen to Deminski & Doyle — On Demand! Hear New Jersey’s favorite afternoon radio show any day of the week. Download the Deminski & Doyle show wherever you get podcasts, on our free app, or listen right now:

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