A few weeks ago I introduced you to Garwood Board of Education Member Sal Piarulli who introduced the resolution that shot down the State Board of Education's sexualized curriculum.

Garwood was the first in the state to shoot down the radicalized curriculum.

Now, at least 18 districts have followed suit and either shot down the curriculum altogether or created an "opt-in," which effectively stops the program in its tracks.

Middletown is leading the way as one of NJ's larger school districts with its "opt-in" plan.

In addition, the parents in Cedar Grove fought back and generated enough parent involvement to recall a BOE member who pushed the sexualized agenda on kids. She resigned instead of facing the voters.

If you agree that it's time to stop pushing a radical sexualized agenda in our schools and go back to reading, writing, civics, history, math — you know, school things — then join me and send a letter to your legislators and tell them you've had enough.

The power of parents speaking out cannot be underestimated.

In addition to the school districts now standing up for kids, we know politicians back down in the face of public outcry. Have your voice heard! Sign my petition and send your letter today by clicking HERE.

I want to thank the leaders who are fighting on the front lines, including Tom Mastrangelo, the Morris County commissioner who is fighting back at the county level, Sean Mabey in Kinnelon, Sal Piarulli in Garwood, and Jacqueline Tobacco in Middletown. And Josh Aiken who heads up AriseNJ, the group empowering parents running for local boards and leading the conversation about standing for moms, dads, and kids.

Now there are school districts that are NOT fighting back and we heard from one mom from Roxbury:

Listen to Jacqueline Tobacco's call here:

Listen to Josh Aiken's call here:

Listen to Sal Piarulli's call here:

The post above reflects the thoughts and observations of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Bill Spadea. Any opinions expressed are Bill's own. Bill Spadea is on the air weekdays from 6 to 10 a.m., talkin’ Jersey, taking your calls at 1-800-283-1015.

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