Murder hornets never even ended up being the problem we thought they’d be, so that was a non-starter. (Phew)

Then New Jersey made it through the invasion of cicadas unscathed last spring.

We successfully battled the spotted lanternflies, despite them being all over the place during the summer of 2021.

We’re not sounding off the alarms yet, but if you’re a coward when it comes to bugs (like yours truly), you’ll want a heads up about this.

The newest creepy crawler to be concerned about? The Joro spider.

A study was released out of the University of Georgia that a Japan-native spider has made its way to the U.S. and it is predicted that it will make its way up the East Coast.

The 3-inch-long spider can survive cold temperatures with seemingly no problem, which is why they’ll be able to travel without many issues over the next few months.

What will make their spread even easier? Humans unknowingly moving them from place to place (for instance: traveling with them on your car) is worrisome, but it isn’t the only way they can travel far.

Spider Takeover
AP
loading...

These arachnids can transport themselves using their webs. They make a parachute or balloon shape and set sail following the wind.

The scientists who performed the study are guessing we’ll start to see the spiders traveling closer to us around June.

Those without arachnophobia have little to worry about. While the Joro spiders can bite, they are unlikely to do so and they aren’t poisonous enough to worry about. Think of it as a bee sting, in that it’ll feel like a little pinch and in most cases won’t require medical attention.

Keep an eye out, New Jersey, one of these bad boys could be parachuting toward you in the next few months.

The post above reflects the thoughts and observations of New Jersey 101.5's Kylie Moore. Any opinions expressed are Kylie's own. You can follow Kylie on Instagram.

8 ways to battle the spotted lanternfly in NJ

2022 Seaside Heights Polar Bear Plunge photos

More than 6,000 people took the plunge into the Atlantic Ocean on Feb. 26, 2022 to raise more than $2 million for the Special Olympics New Jersey.

2021 NJ property taxes: See how your town compares

Find your municipality in this alphabetical list to see how its average property tax bill for 2021 compares to others. You can also see how much the average bill changed from 2020. For an interactive map version, click here. And for the full analysis by New Jersey 101.5, read this story.