As the #FreedomConvoy continues through the freezing cold Canadian winter, I'm doing my part to show support.

Canadian PM Trudeau Invokes Emergencies Act As Protests Continue In Ottawa
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Brave Canadian working-class men and women are standing their ground against what many of us are calling tyrannical actions on the part of the Canadian government.

Canadian PM Trudeau Invokes Emergencies Act As Protests Continue In Ottawa
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If you are paying attention to what's going on in the Canadian capital city, it's clear that the trucker protest has been peaceful from the beginning. The government acted and said that it was just a "fringe minority," but the video evidence shows that it's a tad more than that.

The government tried and failed through the complicit media to accuse the peaceful protest against outrageous liberty-destroying government policy of being "neo-Nazis" and "white supremacists." That accusation got a swift and angered response from two dozen Israeli doctors outraged by the comparison and the policies the protesters are fighting.

From my perspective, the violence started after the state militia got involved. Social media is full of videos of armed men and soldiers preventing local shops from opening to feed the protesters. We've even read the reports of bank accounts of sympathetic contributors being frozen.

It's got to stop before the violence increases and this ends ugly. The only solution here is for the Ottowa national government to take their "knee off the neck" of the free Canadian people and rescind all the policies that have crushed liberty and the economy for the past two years.

The post above reflects the thoughts and observations of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Bill Spadea. Any opinions expressed are Bill's own. Bill Spadea is on the air weekdays from 6 to 10 a.m., talkin’ Jersey, taking your calls at 1-800-283-1015.

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