BRICK — Four individuals, including one minor, who were arrested for attempting to steal $1,000 worth of merchandise from Target, are connected to multiple shoplifting incidents at other stores in New Jersey and beyond, according to Brick police.

David Jamaluddin, 21, of New York, Eduard Kagalvosky, 19, of New York, Margarite Peconio, 19, of New York, and a juvenile were all charged with two counts of third-degree shoplifting.

According to police, the four suspects were inside the Target on Rt. 70 at approximately 6 p.m. on March 7 when authorities responded to the store on a report of shoplifting. Officers stopped and arrested the individuals when they wheeled out over $1,000 worth of merchandise in a shopping cart without paying.

The suspects also stole over $400 worth of merchandise from the same store on Feb. 2, officers said. Further investigation revealed proceeds, worth thousands, from other stores, including Target locations in Howell and Manalapan, and Kohls in Howell, according to police. Officials also spotted merchandise from TJ Maxx and DSW.

According to police, the suspects are connected to shoplifting incidents "throughout the tri-state area."

The investigation is ongoing. The juvenile was released to a guardian and the three adults were released on summonses.

Dino Flammia is a reporter for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at dino.flammia@townsquaremedia.com

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