While efforts appear to be stalled on the state level to reduce the use of plastic bags, straws, Styrofoam and other single-use plastic products, New Jersey municipalities continue to implement their own rules to manage the unsightly and damaging pollution issue.

And although plastic waste is most visibly present along the state's shoreline, the issue is also attracting plenty attention and action from cities and towns nowhere near the coast, including those in North Jersey.

"In nearly every county right now we have a town that has passed a ban on single-use plastic or is considering it," said Doug O'Malley, director of Environment New Jersey.

In Bergen County, Glen Rock recently became the latest New Jersey municipality to outlaw plastic bags at retail establishments. The borough's ordinance, which goes into effect next year, prohibits businesses from using single-use plastic carry-out bags, and allows consumers to purchase paper bags and reusable bags for 10 cents apiece.

Jersey City is set to enforce its own bag ban on June 28, and Hoboken launched its ban in January, as select municipalities in Essex and Morris counties plan to move on the issue in the weeks ahead.

"Trash doesn't stay within municipal boundaries and all waterways lead to our ocean, so we all have a stake in reducing plastic pollution," said Nandini Checko, project director with the Association of New Jersey Environmental Commissions. "It's important that we get Towns all across New Jersey to join this effort."

According to ANJEC, municipalities in the state have passed more than 50 ordinances to reduce the use of single-use plastic, including balloons. Plastic bags are specifically targeted by 26 ordinances throughout the state, the association said.

"New Jersey residents use 4.4 billion plastic bags each year," Checko added.

In August, Gov. Phil Murphy vetoed legislation that would have imposed a fee on single-use plastic and paper bags. In a statement, Murphy said he didn't think the measure went far enough, possibly setting the stage for a complete ban. New Jersey lawmakers recently announced their plans to scrap the fee option.

"What we use for five minutes should not be in our environment for generations," O'Malley said. "I think the reason why we're seeing so many ban bills pass through at the town level is that every community in New Jersey is inundated by single-use plastic."

The Jersey Shore is still home to most of the ordinances targeting plastics. Monmouth Beach, ANJEC said, has one of the strictest bans in the country, forbidding merchants from offering plastic bags, plastic straws and foam takeout containers.

Locales in the state that have banned or taxed plastic bags:

Atlantic County

The county law prohibits the use of single-use bags in county parks. This took effect in August and violators will be given warnings until August 2019. After that, violators face fines of up to $500.

Avalon

Restaurants cannot use single-use bags or Styrofoam containers for leftovers or take-out. This takes effect in June 2019.

Beach Haven

Since June, restaurants and shops have not been allowed to provide plastic carry-out bags. Bait shops are exempt. Fines of up to $500.

Belmar

Since May, shops and restaurants have not been allowed to provide plastic carry-out bags. Violators face fines of up to a maximum of $10,000.

Bradley Beach

Starting January, businesses will not be allowed to provide plastic carry-out bags and must charge 5 cents for paper bags.

Brigantine

Since June, businesses have been prohibited from providing plastic carry-out bags. Fines of up to $500.

Glen Rock

Businesses are prohibited from using single-use plastic bags. Reusable thick-plastic bags and paper bags are subject to a 10-cent fee, which stores keep. Produce bags and small paper bags used for prescriptions or breads are exempt.

Harvey Cedars

Plastic carry-out bags have been banned since June. Bait shops are exempt.

Hoboken

Starting this month, stores much charge a fee of 10 to 25 cents for paper bags and provide reusable bags for a 10-cent fee. Stores cannot charge feesfor people on welfare.

Jersey City

Starting in June 2019, stores will be prohibited from providing plastic carry-out bags. Bags used for produce, frozen food and meats and pharmacy bags for prescriptions are exempt. The ordinance also bans non-recycled paper bags and biodegradable plastic bags that are not at least 2.25 millimeters thick.

Lambertville

The ban on plastic bags, straws and Styrofoam containers becomes mandatory in January 2020.

Long Beach

Since May, stores have been prohibited from handing out carry-out plastic bags. Bait shops are exempt.

Longport

This town's pioneering 2015 ordinance requires customers to ask for bags and pay a 10-cent fee.

Monmouth Beach

Since June, plastic carry-out bags, straws and Styrofoam containers have been banned. Fines of up to $2,400.

Point Pleasant Beach

Since May, stores have been prohibited from handing out carry-out plastic bags. Bait shops are exempt.

Somers Point

Starting Jan. 1, stores are required to charge a 5-cent fee for carry-out bags. Restaurants and street vendors are exempt.

Stafford

Plastic carry-out bags are banned starting this month.

Stone Harbor

No plastic carry-out bags, straws or Styrofoam containers for leftovers or take-out. Paper bags and plastic utensils have to be made of recycled material. Utensils, lids and condiment packages have to be given upon request. Bags and containers for things like raw meat and flowers are exempt.

Teaneck

Stores must charge 5 cents for plastic carry-out bags. Fines of up to $250. This has been in place since July.

Ventnor City

Since October, stores have been required to charge 5 cents for paper and plastic carry-out bags. Customers on welfare are exempt.

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Contact reporter Dino Flammia at dino.flammia@townsquaremedia.com.