‘Late Night’ with Seth Myers welcomed Jack Antonoff a few nights ago and in typical fashion he was as brutally honest as they come.

The singer/musician of Bleachers and Fun fame was of course born and raised right here in the Dirty Jerz. A Jewish kid who was born in Bergenfield and who grew up in New Milford and Woodcliff Lake, Antonoff is 37 years old now and told a crazy story to Meyers that outted his parents as drug users.

The Grammy winner spoke almost lovingly of how as he’s gotten older and his parents became less and less responsible for him and could drop the role model stuff the more and more they liked to party. It’s almost like Jack’s dad is becoming Willie Nelson.

But what you’ll really like is the part of the interview when he talks about having collaborated with Bruce Springsteen and what his music has meant to him and his feelings for New Jersey.

After talking about how Bruce’s music made singers and musicians embrace a Jersey sound Seth Meyers asked him about the elephant in the room. If people say they love New Jersey so much why are they so often saying they want to get out? (Or singing it, as in Springsteen’s “we gotta get out while we’re young.”)

Antanoff admits it’s part of the Jersey experience. Basically loving and hating it simultaneously. He says it may be about getting out but it’s more about “reaching for something.” As someone born here, raised here, I completely get it.

Some fun facts about Jack Antonoff:

He’s won five Grammy Awards.

He’s been nominated for a Golden Globe.

He was once in a relationship with Scarlett Johansson.

He’s currently in a relationship with model Carlotta Kohl.

Some not-so-fun facts about Jack Antonoff:

He struggles with anxiety and depression.

He also has obsessive-compulsive disorder and struggles with germophobia.

The post above reflects the thoughts and observations of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Jeff Deminski. Any opinions expressed are Jeff Deminski's own.

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