What do you do when you're settling in to watch a movie with the family and a scene comes up that you really wish you could fast forward through?

Last weekend we had a few hours off between shows and decided to catch a movie with the family. I recently saw a powerful movie with Adrien Brody, "The Pianist". I know it literally came out almost 20 years ago, but I'm still catching up on movie watching from the days of three jobs!

Anyway, we thought, let's grab another Adrien Brody film, we found Manhattan Night, a little more recent, made in 2016, and settled in to watch. My son and his girlfriend joined us to spend a couple hours of downtime. About ten or twenty minutes into the film, Brody's character is seduced by the women he met at an event, who just lost her husband. The scene was a little more than I was comfortable with at family movie time. So I did the adult thing, just watched and hoped it ended soon. It's not like the kids are too young to view R movies, they're 18 after all, but I just didn't want to watch it with them. Same goes for my 79 year old mother-in-law. It would have actually been more uncomfortable!

Has this happened to you? I asked this question in the morning with Eric Scott. His movie experience was watching "The Wolf of Wall Street" with his kids, the oldest was 16. HE turned it off as the language started in with fury. Of course his son reacted by telling his dad that he's heard worse at school. That's of course true, but it's more about you not wanting to hear and watch it with them, right? Or am I overreacting?

The post above reflects the thoughts and observations of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Bill Spadea. Any opinions expressed are Bill's own. Bill Spadea is on the air weekdays from 6 to 10 a.m., talkin’ Jersey, taking your calls at 1-800-283-1015.

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