PATERSON — It's been decades since broadcast networks have aired Saturday morning cartoon blocks, but students in this city district will need to pause YouTube or streaming services for a few hours and step into the virtual classroom this weekend.

NJ.com reported that Saturday's makeup day has been known to kids and parents for about a month, having been announced just before the holiday break as a replacement for the cancellation of classes on Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2021, due to impending severe weather.

The NJ.com report said that the 8:20 a.m. to 1 p.m. instruction period was originally intended to be in person, but has been changed to remote because the district's post-holiday return to full in-person learning was delayed until Monday.

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Paterson has about 25,000 students, according to NJ.com, and educators districtwide were consulted about the Saturday makeup.

Virtual learning days typically do not count toward New Jersey's 180-day school calendar minimum, the NJ.com report said, but an executive order issued by Gov. Phil Murphy made an exception for rescheduling related to COVID in any way.

Chief Meteorologist Dan Zarrow said the Oct. 26 nor'easter dumped at least 3 to 4 inches of rain over parts of Passaic County.

Patrick Lavery is New Jersey 101.5's afternoon news anchor. Follow him on Twitter @plavery1015 or email patrick.lavery@townsquaremedia.com.

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