LACEY — Two peacocks were killed in front of the Popcorn Park Zoo Tuesday morning when they were struck by a car, according to Executive Director John Bergman.

"Our peacocks are free range.  They stay on our side of the road. But early this morning two of them crossed over Lacey Road and unfortunately got hit by a car," Bergman told New Jersey 101.5. He estimates they were hit about 7:30 a.m.

Bergman said no one from the zoo in the Forked River section witnessed the incident so it's not clear what exactly led to them being hit.

"We don't know what happened. There's a little bit of a rise when you come over. Also if they're flying, it's like a deer coming out in front of you," he said.

Male peacocks can weigh 8 to 13 pounds while female peahens weigh 6 to 9 pounds.

Popcorn Park Zoo has 80 peacocks under its care, according to Bergman. He advised drivers to be careful in the area of the zoo.

Lacey police spokesman Robert Flynn told New Jersey 101.5 that they did not receive any calls or respond to any incidents related to the zoo on Tuesday morning. However, reporting a motor vehicle incident with an animal is only required for domesticated animals and certain livestock, not wildlife.

WOBM's Shawn Michaels was first to report about the peacocks being hit.

Contact reporter Dan Alexander at Dan.Alexander@townsquaremedia.com or via Twitter @DanAlexanderNJ

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