Just a note about that headline. I understand what happened on the Turnpike Monday afternoon was organized by people sympathetic with undocumented immigrants and were not necessarily undocumented themselves. So yes, I get that you can’t legally deport U.S. citizens. But guess what? If they don’t care about laws then why should I?

Here’s what happened.

According to nj.com, in the 5o’clock hour a group called Y Nosotros Que demonstrated at the Grover Cleveland Service Area on the New Jersey Turnpike demanding far more money in pandemic relief for illegal immigrants than the $40 million Gov Murphy has already promised.

They want $1 billion. Billion. With a b. And they’re clearly willing to break the law to get it.

Because they left the rest area and according to nj.com dozens of cars took to the turnpike itself and drivers got out of their vehicles and held up signs across the roadway and brought Traffic to a grinding halt. This went on according to their report for a good 10 minutes. Apparently by the time the State Police were arriving the group was already dispersing but traffic was backed up and residual effects remained for half an hour.

One of the signs read WE THE WORKERS DEMAND $1 BILLION.

Another read RECOVERY FOR ALL IS FOR ALL NOT JUST A FEW.

Demand. Let that sink in. They...demand. In what alternate reality can people sneak into a country and violate immigration laws and then demand anything? The majority of illegal immigrants in New Jersey are not even paying federal income tax. And they or organizations representing them are going to make demands?

To the vast majority of the undocumented I say this. You do not care about your citizenship status because you do not care about this nation. Citizenship is a two-way street. Citizenship bestows certain rights but it also bestows certain responsibilities. Serving on a jury. Fighting for your nation when called upon. And not cutting and running when the economy gets bad.

Why do I say that last part? A telltale sign that most illegals care nothing about the nation is that during what is now called the Great Recession of 2008 and 2009 illegal immigration practically stopped. When there was no money to be made, which is what most of them only care about, they suddenly had no interest. They weren’t interested in the American way of life. They were not interested in freedom.

So my patience is over. You have the audacity to demand $1 billion from a country you don’t belong in? It wasn’t enough you’ve been given welfare. It wasn’t enough school districts in New Jersey don’t ask questions about your illegal children and go ahead and educate them. It wasn’t enough that when they’re older they receive in-state tuition and then tuition assistance. It wasn’t enough that we’re giving you driver's licenses. So you want $1 billion. So you want the privileges without the responsibilities.

And now you’re going to start blocking our highways if you don’t get your way? Every last person involved in shutting down the New Jersey Turnpike Monday ought to be removed from this country. Period.

The post above reflects the thoughts and observations of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Jeff Deminski. Any opinions expressed are Jeff Deminski's own.

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