WILLINGBORO — A Pennsylvania man is charged with murder and a woman identified as his girlfriend is accused of driving his getaway car, in a confrontation that resulted in the death of a 14-year-old boy on Saturday.

According to a release from the Burlington County Prosecutor's Office, Willingboro police had been notified on Friday that a 2014 Honda Civic had been stolen. The owner of that car frequently allowed it to be used by Tamir Phillips, 22, of Bensalem, Pa., who was known to stay in Willingboro.

On Saturday afternoon just before 3 p.m., authorities said Phillips was riding in a car driven by his girlfriend, Chelsea Holman, 29, of Willingboro, when the pair saw the Civic at a Phillips 66 gas station.

The release said that Holman pulled up behind the Civic, behind the wheel of which was Jesse Everett, 14, of Willingboro, at which point Phillips is alleged to have exited Holman's car, confronted Everett, and fired a single shot into the stolen vehicle.

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Everett was wounded and was pronounced dead at Cooper University Medical Center in Camden later that afternoon. Two other people inside the Civic were not hurt.

Holman and Phillips then drove away, but Phillips was arrested Monday and charged with first-degree murder, second-degree unlawful possession of a weapon, and second-degree possession of a weapon for an unlawful purpose.

Holman, who was not detained, is charged with third-degree hindering apprehension and fourth-degree obstruction of justice.

Patrick Lavery is New Jersey 101.5's afternoon news anchor. Follow him on Twitter @plavery1015 or email patrick.lavery@townsquaremedia.com.

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