TOMS RIVER — After Ocean County Sheriff Mike Mastronardy suggested painting a blue line in support of law enforcement on Hooper Avenue, officials learned that road regulations would only them to fly pro-police flags instead,

But on Monday, somebody decided to jump the gun and paint a blue line down the yellow road dividers anyway.

Authorities say the culprit was David Giordano, a 43-year-old township resident who's had some run-ins with police — not exactly someone with a record that seems police-friendly.

Ocean County Commissioner Gary Quinn told New Jersey 101.5 that surveillance video shows Giordano with his arm out the window of a car as he painted the blue line on Monday.

By afternoon, workers from the county road department painted over it, according to Ocean County Scanner News, which posted before and after photos.

It was Giordano's second run in a week with Toms River police. On March 22, Giordano broke out his impounded bucket truck from Freedom Towing & Recovery on Route 9, drove it through a locked gate and parked it in Mayor Mo Hill's space at the municipal building.

Giordano was charged with theft of movable property, theft of services, burglary and criminal mischief.

"From what I've been told, he's had some issues with law enforcement, which is kind of ironic for him to put a blue line on the road supporting law enforcement," Quinn said.

Quinn told New Jersey 101.5 earlier that as a county road, DOT guidelines prohibit such blue lines. Violating the DOT’s policy puts the liability on the county if something were to happen. The blue line flags of support became 75 flags that would line the same area.

Contact reporter Dan Alexander at Dan.Alexander@townsquaremedia.com or via Twitter @DanAlexanderNJ

Damage from Thunderstorm 3/28/21

A strong line of thunderstorms that moved across New Jersey on Sunday evening ripped parts of a roof off a hotel on the Jersey Shore and a factory in Trenton.

LOOK: Lakewood, Brick wildfire a 'near catastrophe'

A forest fire near the Jersey Shore that shut down the Garden State Parkway, sent neighbors fleeing and led to a firefighter's hospitalization in critical condition was “a very, very near catastrophe,” authorities said a day later on March 15.