I read David Matthau's story on how Gov. Murphy refuses to back down on his desire to raise taxes on successful people in the form of a millionaires' tax, and my biggest takeaway was this.

He's desperate.

He's not only running TV ads to get his own way against his own party, it's believed he's financing a group engaged in an email blitz encouraging residents to support the tax.

At a time when more than 5,000 millionaires have already moved out of the New Jersey/New York area, he drones on about tax fairness.

“We’ll be talking about tax fairness no matter where we come out, I promise you, on July 1, Sept. 1, Dec. 1 and on into the future till we crack the back.”

He also said, "I don't care about rubbing people the wrong way."

Clearly.

And Phil, you want to tax about tax fairness? Okay, let's.

Take a look at the percentage of our money the state of New Jersey gets. If you're a single filer making between $40,000 and $75,000 a year, they take 5.5% of your money. But if you make $500,000 to $5 million a year, they take 8.97%. Not to get into the old debate about a flat tax (I'd be in favor) but I already find this math unfair. Generally people are rich because they've worked harder, were smarter, risked more, etc.. So I believe our system is already unfair. Now Murphy wants to raise the tax on those making over $1 million to 10.75% from the already higher 8.97%.

Tax fairness?

Give me a break.

What would truly be tax fairness is to be fair to ALL taxpayers by making government smaller, cutting spending, and making New Jersey more affordable again. Chasing out millionaires who might just be inclined to take their businesses with them isn't the answer. But it sure feels good for bitter people who don't like their lot in life to march in step with Murphy and squawk about tax fairness. You want to be fair? Fine. Start letting the government take 8.97% of YOUR paycheck. Then we'll talk fairness.

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