Here we are a few days after a pretty good snowstorm and some people still have a huge cake of snow and ice on the roof of their car. This week while driving south on I-295, I was treated to a huge chunk of ice and snow right on the hood and windshield of my car.

Luckily, no damage was done, and I'm scheduled to get a new windshield in a few days, thanks to a temperature-related crack that keeps getting bigger.

Not that we are usually a fan of more laws, on or off the road, but New Jersey does have a law about clearing the snow and ice off your vehicle to prevent tragic accidents. And there have been some tragic accidents over the years involving chunks of ice flying off of moving vehicles.

https://youtu.be/XkHyxSW4yAA

It only takes a few minutes to clear, and you could be saving a life and avoiding being a jackass. Most people clear their windshields and headlights and maybe a bit of their roof, but lots of people figure it will just innocently blow off once they leave their driveway.

A few years ago, a Somerset County man got a nice surprise driving on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. Nobody was injured in that particular incident and they were lucky.

Every morning I have to clean snow off car in winter season
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Often, you'll see people with ice and snow flying off of their car and they are blissfully unaware. If a cop spots them, it's anywhere from a $25 to $75 fine. If the ice or snow causes damage or injury the fines go up to $200 to $1,000 for each offense.

Get a push broom and clear off the snow from your roof when you're clearing your car before it becomes a deadly projectile a few days later.

Opinions expressed in the post above are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Dennis Malloy only.

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Find your municipality in this alphabetical list to see how its average property tax bill for 2021 compares to others. You can also see how much the average bill changed from 2020. For an interactive map version, click here. And for the full analysis by New Jersey 101.5, read this story.