The New Jersey tax rebate program has been around in one form or another for decades. It's a shell game of meaningless amounts of money with checks written to long-suffering homeowners.

As a percentage of your tax bill, it's a pittance. It's probably less than the amount Murphy would give to his servant staff at Christmas.

Source Adobe Stock By Vitalii Vodolazskyi
Source Adobe Stock By Vitalii Vodolazskyi
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He's now proposing to increase the income threshold for the insulting rebate. It would amount to about $700 a year for families making up to $250k a year. If your tax bill is nine or ten or fifteen thousand a year, that amount is an insult.

CUT PROPERTY TAXES! That's the only answer. That's the reason so many have fled the state.

Source Adobe Stock By Andrey Popov
Source Adobe Stock By Andrey Popov
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Maybe the pensions will go bankrupt after he's gone, and the public workers still have a good impression of him for making contributions. But the truth is, most of our property tax goes to public education. We've seen in the last two years how desperately we need to bring the system of public education into the 21st century. It will take a courageous leader to urge the legislature to make the difficult decisions to implement real change.

The NJEA controls the Legislature and most governors. Until they, not the teachers themselves, are confronted and dealt with in a fiscally responsible manner, all this governor and future governors of this state can do is offer or expand gimmicks like this. They count on us being stupid or leaving in frustration before we can vote them out.

Opinions expressed in the post above are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Dennis Malloy only.

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