For many years, I have been hammering Steve Sweeney as a morally bankrupt insider who serves his own interests instead of the public which repeatedly elected him. He's been the subject of several rants addressing what is wrong with New Jersey and how sacking him would be a good first step to fixing our state.

Ed joined me on the show this week.

The bottom line is that Sen.-elect Ed Durr won a race thanks to the people, not the party elites.

Ed Durr is a regular guy. He's a truck driver, family man, and a Jersey guy to the core. He joined me a few times on the show throughout the campaign providing updates to my audience about his campaign and why it was so important to take Sweeney out.

He ran a strong grassroots campaign and benefitted from the anger built up over the past year and a half as legislators sat idle while Gov. Murphy exercised extreme measures locking down churches, businesses, and households.

Ed's motivation was personal and simple. He was denied a right to carry permit and decided to fight back. It reminds me of the story about Clint Eastwood running for Mayor of Carmel, California, because he was tired of fighting over building permits.

This year, Election Day served as a huge victory for "normal."

 

The bottom line is that Sen.-elect Ed Durr won a race thanks to the people, not the party elites. He owes no special interests and won in spite of being ignored by the insiders that have corrupted the GOP over the decades. Truly a man bringing in fresh blood to the political arena.

This year, Election Day served as a huge victory for "normal." Hundreds of candidates running at the local level — many of whom running for the first time — winning seats across the state by opposing the overreach of government. Moms, dads, and regular working people standing up and saying enough is enough.

You can visit his campaign website at 3d4nj.com

The post above reflects the thoughts and observations of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Bill Spadea. Any opinions expressed are Bill's own. Bill Spadea is on the air weekdays from 6 to 10 a.m., talkin’ Jersey, taking your calls at 1-800-283-1015.

9 of the nation’s most miserable cities are in New Jersey