From estate sales to business liquidations to chickens and goats, New Jersey's auction business is alive and well.

We talked about auctions on the air last week and heard some amazing stories of incredible deals on cars or property. There are auctions in just about every corner of the state.

We even spoke to a professional auctioneer who told us there are auctioneer schools if you're interested in becoming one.

It turns out it's more than just the fast-talking and keeping an eye on the crowd of bidders. There is a lot of leg work that goes into it, like cataloging and verifying the merchandise and organizing the sales.

For years a friend asked me to go with him to a livestock auction in my area. I don't need any goats or chickens, so I've never been.

Auction sign
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He said it's worth going just to see what goes on there. We mentioned Harker's on the air and Penny Harker, part of the three generations of her family in the business, called in. She informed us that there is a general auction on Thursday nights and the livestock auction happens every Saturday night.

If you're tired of the usual dinner and a movie, this might actually be a better choice for entertainment.

The good old-fashioned auction is still kicking in New Jersey. Some are online and many are still in person. There should be enough information here to see exactly what an auction is and where to find one in New Jersey.

Happy bidding!

Opinions expressed in the post above are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Dennis Malloy only.

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Every NJ city and town's municipal tax bill, ranked

A little less than 30 cents of every $1 in property taxes charged in New Jersey support municipal services provided by cities, towns, townships, boroughs and villages. Statewide, the average municipal-only tax bill in 2021 was $2,725, but that varied widely from more than $13,000 in Tavistock to nothing in three townships. In addition to $9.22 billion in municipal purpose taxes, special taxing districts that in some places provide municipal services such as fire protection, garbage collection or economic development levied $323.8 million in 2021.