Well, we all knew this was coming. I’m talking about bribing people to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

Gov. Murphy has been making the rounds in the media hinting that bribing people to get the vaccine is not off the table. And it’s a proven system. After all, it has worked in other states.

For instance, my son lives in a state where they are paying people $100 to get the vaccine. And I had a feeling it would come to this. There are just too many people who, like me, don’t see any good reason to get jabbed with an “emergency use” brand-new vaccine when it’s not an emergency.

Even though I’m not planning to get the COVID-19 vaccine, I never said I thought I would die from it. I don’t think I’m any more likely to die from the vaccine than I am from the virus itself. But if it’s so important to the government that I get vaccinated that they’re willing to pay me for it, I have one question for them: What’s it worth to you?

Bearing in mind that if the government wants me to do something SO BADLY that they’re willing to pay me for it, my suspicion is pretty high. I’m pretty wary of their motives. I mean is this really about “public health” at this point?

On the other hand, can I name my price? Because $100 is not going to do it. Again, I probably won’t be in any great danger if I do take the shot, so I don’t need millions of dollars in incentive money. But, the offer has to be worth my while.

I’m thinking maybe enough to buy me a new car ... preferably a Porsche. Or if they want me to get the vaccine that gets you really sick after the second jab, I might hold out for something a little bit closer to vacation home territory. So, let me know, Guv. You certainly have enough money in the coffers to really take care of me. Maybe it’ll take some negotiation, but throw me your best offer and I’ll let you know!

The post above reflects the thoughts and observations of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Judi Franco. Any opinions expressed are Judi Franco’s own.

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