New Jersey isn’t shy about technology. In fact a few years back Bloomberg’s U.S. Innovation Index (it ranks states on how much of their economy is centered on science and technology) we ranked #4 in the nation.

So we embrace technology. But only if it makes sense. Here’s one that makes no sense at all.

Someone had the genius idea of replacing all the glass doors on the coolers in Walgreens with high-tech digital screens. These screens can display large ads but when a customer walks by they will change to show items contained inside the coolers.

If you’re interested you open the door and maybe your item is still in stock or maybe they’re out of it. Without the glass door to look through you don’t know until you open it.

Here’s a video that demonstrates what you’d be seeing.

What’s not to hate? What a ridiculous idea. Basically be tricked into opening a door only to be sometimes disappointed. This wastes the customer’s time. This wastes the cold air escaping the cooler and adds to the utility cost. Then also wastes the electricity powering these door/screens.

Of course people have been taking to social media to complain. They feel used by having to watch all the advertising. And I’m sure annoyed by the will-it-or-won’t-it-really-be-inside-when-I-open-it game.

Ridiculous.

This started with the plan to put the first digital screens in place of glass cooler doors at 50 Chicago area Walgreens. The company says it wants to expand it to 2,500 locations.

All I know is there are 199 Walgreens locations in New Jersey and they’d better not put one of these things at mine.

Opinions expressed in the post above are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Jeff Deminski only.

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