New Jersey is out with updated resources for expectant women and their caregivers, and residents who are planning to become pregnant during the coronavirus pandemic.

Compared to the early days of COVID-19, there are many more clear-cut answers today regarding the potential risks of giving birth and taking care of a newborn during a pandemic. And healthcare professionals over time have picked up on the common concerns among parents and their supporters, which are also addressed with the new resources.

"The resources were really developed to ensure that even during a pandemic, every pregnant person in New Jersey is aware of and has access to safe and high-quality care," said Adelisa Perez-Hudgins, director of quality at New Jersey Health Care Quality Institute.

NJHCQI partnered with the New Jersey Department of Health and led a wokrgroup that helped to develop the resources, which are available now on the DOH Maternal Care Quality Collaborative website.

"Although this information is particularly relevant during the pandemic, there's a lot of information in there that will still be really valuable after the pandemic is over," Perez-Hudgins added.

Topics covered include choosing a place to give birth; what to expect from your health care team; and when to call your doctor, midwife, or nurse, among others. Plus, FAQs take on some of the misconceptions that may linger related to COVID-19 and pregnancy.

"We really want to make sure that pregnant people know that it is safe to get the (COVID-19) vaccine during pregnancy," Perez-Hudgins said.

The resources also note that mothers can breastfeed whether or not they're positive for COVID-19, and that state law requires hospitals to let moms have at least one support person in the room during labor, delivery, and the postpartum period.

Contact reporter Dino Flammia at dino.flammia@townsquaremedia.com.

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