Are there worms in the water being delivered to homes by the Trenton Water Works?

Testing is underway after a resident found small inchworms in his home's water filter.

They are likely midge larvae, which are coming from the open reservoir used by Trenton Water Works to get its water. The reservoir is open, which allows green algae to grow. Midge larva like to feed on the algae.

The problem is actually not new. One homeowner claims he's been finding the worms in his water filter for years, and has been trying to get the water company to do something about it.

B. Schoenmakers
B. Schoenmakers
loading...

Mark Lavenberg, director of Trenton Water Works tells NJ.com they are doing "extensive testing" of the reservoir and around the home where the worms were found.

Although it may be gross to consider these tiny worms are coming out of the tap, they don't actually pose any known health concerns.

Entomologists say they are not known to spread any kind of disease.

Phil Koehler, University of Florida
Phil Koehler, University of Florida
loading...

North Carolina Extension biologists did a study on non-biting midge flies, and concluded they were "highly beneficial and desirable in aquatic habitats." In addition to being an important food source for fish, birds and other aquatic life, "larvae 'clean' the aquatic environment by consuming and recycling organic debris."

When mature, however, , adult midges often emerge in very large numbers, causing a variety of nuisance and other problems for people who reside within the flight range of these insects.

They are often mistaken for mosquitoes, although midges do not bite.

M. Harrell, Edenton, NC
M. Harrell, Edenton, NC
loading...

It is unlikely, however, you would want the midge worms coming out of your tap.

Both Trenton Water Works and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection are attempting to determine the extent of the infestation in the water supply, and determine next steps.

Eric Scott is the senior political director and anchor for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at eric.scott@townsquaremedia.com

Click here to contact an editor about feedback or a correction for this story.

LOOK: 31 breathtaking images from NASA's public library

In 2017, NASA opened the digital doors to its image and video library website, allowing the public to access more than 140,000 images, videos, and audio files. The collection provides unprecedented views of space. Stacker reviewed the collection to select 31 of the most breathtaking images, including the first from the James Webb Space Telescope. Keep reading to see these stunning images, curated with further information about the captured scenes.

LOOK: What are the odds that these 50 totally random events will happen to you?

Stacker took the guesswork out of 50 random events to determine just how likely they are to actually happen. They sourced their information from government statistics, scientific articles, and other primary documents. Keep reading to find out why expectant parents shouldn't count on due dates -- and why you should be more worried about dying on your birthday than living to 100 years old.

Cape May, NJ: 15 wonderful places to visit