White men from South Jersey were more likely to be diagnosed with cancer in 2014, according to recent state and federal cancer statistics.

The most recent data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that New Jersey is one of the top states in the nation for new cancer cases.

The Garden State ranks seventh in the nation, with all its bordering states ranking in the Top 10.

1. Kentucky — 513.7 per 100,000 people
2. Delaware — 488.1
3. Louisiana — 478.7
4. Pennsylvania — 477.3
5. New York — 476.5
6. Maine — 474.6
7. New Jersey — 472.8

(CDC)

But while New Jersey's cancer rates are higher than most states, people in New Jersey are less likely to die from cancer than people living in the South or the Midwest.

In 2014, New Jersey saw 49,614 new cancer cases while 16,591 deaths were reported. New York and Connecticut had lower mortality rates while Pennsylvania and Delaware had higher death rates.

How could other regions of the country have fewer cancer cases but higher death rates? Experts believe one reason could be better cancer treatment in New Jersey and the Northeast, which could result in more cancer diagnoses and earlier treatment.

(CDC)

Nationally, there were 1.59 million new cancer cases and nearly 600,000 people of cancer, which is the second leading cause of death after heart disease.

In New Jersey, men had a higher rate of new cancers — 509.3 per 100,000 versus 451.9 for women in 2013, the most recent year for which data is available from the New Jersey State Cancer Registry.

Among races and ethnicities in the state, whites had a higher rate — 481 per 100,000 as compared to 423.3 for blacks, 380.8 for Hispanics and 274.4 for Asians.

Counties in South Jersey had the highest rates of new cancers. Hudson County had the lowest rate of new cases.

South Jersey had the highest mortality rates (click chart below). The county with the lowest mortality rate was Bergen, followed by the Central Jersey counties of Somerset, Middlesex, Hunterdon and Union as well as Morris.

Cancer cases by county

Salem — 504 cases — Rate of 591.9

Cape May — 887 cases — Rate of 573.9

Gloucester — 1,760 cases — Rate of 534

Burlington — 2,904 cases — Rate of 531.9

Warren — 692 cases — Rate of 531.4

Cumberland — 901 cases — Rate of 526.2

Camden — 3,027 cases — Rate of 521.4

Monmouth — 4,020 cases — Rate of 520.8

Sussex — 895 cases — Rate of 514.2

Ocean — 4,293 cases — Rate of 506.7

Atlantic — 1,631 cases — Rate of 496.9

Morris — 2,982 cases — Rate of 492.7

Mortality rates

Mercer — 2,021 cases — Rate of 486.8

Somerset — 1,848 cases — Rate of 486.8

Bergen — 5,374 cases — Rate of 466.6

Middlesex — 4,185 cases — Rate of 462.8

Essex — 3,823 cases — Rate of 462.7

Union — 2,683 cases — Rate of 451.5

Passaic — 2,392 cases — Rate of 440.7

Hunterdon — 686 cases — Rate of 427.8

Hudson — 2,472 cases — Rate of 399

Types of cancers

New cancer cases in New Jersey were more likely to occur in women's breasts followed by the prostate in men.

The highest cancer death rates in New Jersey were a result of cancers in the lungs, followed by breast and prostate cancers.

Sergio Bichao is deputy digital editor at New Jersey 101.5. Send him news tips: Call 609-359-5348 or email sergio.bichao@townsquaremedia.com.

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