The American boardwalk was born in Atlantic City in the late 1800s. Eight feet wide, one foot high and a mile long, the original boardwalk was open to the public on June 26, 1870 and has been a popular location for tourists ever since.

Here's a look back at some postcards and photos from the early years in Atlantic City.

Bearing a one-cent George Washington stamp, this postcard shows a crowded Atlantic City Steel Pier entrance. It's postmarked July 22, 1913. (Wikicommons: Herman Becher scan)
Atlantic City Boardwalk is shown in this photo circa 1923 in Atlantic City, NJ. (Wikicommons photo: Ian Sutton)
The Atlantic City Boardwalk is shown in this photo circa 1950s to 1960s. (NJ State Archives: Dept. of Agriculture Photos / Box 25)
Rosemary Mood is crowned 1962 New Jersey Peach Queen in Atlantic City. (NJ State Archives: Dept. of Agriculture Collection / Box 22)
This photo is titled "Wringing Wet, Atlantic City, N.J." and was taken sometime between 1875 to 1905. (WIKICOMMONS: NY Public Library Stephen A. Schwarzman Building / Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs)
This card promotes an excursion on the Camden and Atlantic Railroad on July 27, 1880. (Wikicommons: Ringgold Band of Reading)
This view of the Atlantic City boardwalk from 1917 shows billboards advertising Bevo and Coca-Cola reminding consumers not to waste food. (Wikicommons: Library of Congress)
This postcard titled "Oh, Come off" from Atlantic City is circa 1902-1903. (NY Public Library Photography Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs)