NEWARK (AP) — One of the men appointed by Gov. Chris Christie to try to get Atlantic City back on its feet is moving on.

Kevyn Orr (Joshua Lott/Getty Images)

Kevyn Orr, who shepherded Detroit through its municipal bankruptcy, is returning to his former law firm, Jones Day.

A spokesman for the governor's office says Orr's position was always intended to be temporary.

"From the start, it was made clear that Kevyn Orr would lend his expertise as a short-term consultant to Kevin Lavin, who continues to lead all efforts to review and improve the operations, finances and culture of Atlantic City's government to bring long-term stability to the resort town," said spokesman Brian Murray. "Kevyn Orr will finalize his work by the end of the month, as the emergency management team continues its efforts to stabilize the city's finances and releases its next assessment report in June."

Orr was hired along with corporate turnaround expert Kevin Lavin in January to recommend ways to help Atlantic City recover after multiple casino closings.

The city recently brought on a former bankruptcy judge to help with the efforts.

Their first report recommended cutting Atlantic City's municipal budget by $10 million on top of the $30 million in cuts already made. It also considers additional state and federal aid, and suggests delaying pension and health insurance payments.

But the officials, who call themselves "the two Kevins," have thus far not recommended a municipal bankruptcy filing for Atlantic City.

Lavin is being paid $135,000 per year. The governor's office has declined for months to say what or how Orr is being paid, saying the details of his compensation have not been finalized.

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