civil rights

Civil Rights Commemoration
Civil Rights Commemoration
SELMA, Ala. (AP) -- America's racial history "still casts its long shadow upon us," President Barack Obama said Saturday as he stood in solidarity and remembrance with civil rights activists whose beatings by police a half-century ago galvanized much of the nation against racial oppression and hastened passage of historic voting rights for minorities.
5 things to know about the 1964 Civil Rights Act
5 things to know about the 1964 Civil Rights Act
WASHINGTON (AP) -- On July 2, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964, one of the most significant civil rights achievements in U.S. history. This new law made it illegal to discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin; It ended school, work and public facility discrimination, and barred unequal application of voter registration
Obama Cites Progress at Civil Rights Summit
Obama Cites Progress at Civil Rights Summit
Barack Obama was 2 years old when Lyndon Baines Johnson sat in the East Room of the White House with Martin Luther King Jr. and signed the Civil Rights Act, putting an end to an America where schools, restaurants and water fountains were divided by race. Half a century later, the first black man to become president is commemorating what's been accomplished in his lifetime and recommitting the nati

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