The average size of a home in the U.S. is greater than 2,500 square feet. Imagine living in a home about a fifth of that size.

A tiny house (Photo credit: onepony, ThinkStock)

That’s the cramped, but wanted, reality for folks across the country who are downsizing into incredibly small living quarters.

The tiny house movement has received plenty of buzz lately through the reality television program "Tiny House Nation," which features couples and families going from lots of space to barely any.

The movement does have some action in the Garden State.

“Some of our members are doing tiny home development as we speak,” said Staci Berger, president of the Housing and Community Development Network of New Jersey. “They’re also doing micro-units, which are more like really small apartments.”

A complex in Boonton would suggest the concept isn’t something completely new. Built nearly 50 years ago, the row of 14 tiny homes has been a lifesaver for low income earners.

Berger said the move from big to small is a clear-cut way to save money, but it also limits one’s footprint on the environment.

“People are very conscious of how much energy and water a large home takes to function,” she said.

Berger noted tiny homes don’t solve the housing crisis for everyone in New Jersey, but they are certainly an option for folks who don’t need a huge home – just a space to call their own.