As we recognize 'Domestic Violence Awareness Month' in October, Lisa's Light Foundation is continuing their work raising awareness about the issue.

Lisa's Light Foundation (Facebook)

The non-profit launched in 2009, in the wake of the tragic murder of 30-year-old Lisa Zindell by her ex-fiancee, Frank Frisco, who then killed himself.

The Toms River woman's death followed two months of domestic violence incidents and violations of a restraining order by Frisco after she broke off their engagement that spring.

Friend Tara DeLorme, along with a group of other friends and family members, started Lisa's Light Foundation to honor Lisa's memory while supporting domestic violence victims.

"We focus mainly on reaching out to the community and educating and advocating for domestic violence victims and the cycle of domestic violence," DeLorme said.

"We believe that if we continue to tell her story, we hope to be able to save lives in the future."

With the recent incidents happening around the NFL, people are paying even closer attention to this vital issue.

"This is something that could happen to any one of us at any time, male and female," DeLorme said.

Lisa's Light often raises money to provide scholarships for young women and passes on donations to bigger organizations for larger outreach.

DeLorme said, recently, much of their attention has been focused on getting 'Lisa's Law' re-passed and signed.

Lisa Zindell (Facebook)

The measure would track certain domestic violence offenders using GPS devices. It was passed last year, but conditionally vetoed by Gov. Chris Christie in January so that the attorney general's office could review it and determine if the technology is available.

That report came out on Oct. 1 and drew the ire of the bill sponsor, Assembly Troy Singleton (D-Mount Laurel).

They are now working to re-introduce the bill.

"Now we are just going to go through that process again hopefully as quickly as we can, and get it back on the governor's desk," DeLorme said.

While they work with lawmakers on that legislation, the grass-roots group moves forward with their mission to save lives through a word-of-mouth chain and community effort, using Lisa's name and story.

"There is nothing more important than to honor her and save lives in her name because if she were still here, that's what she would be doing," DeLorme said.

Find out more about this great New Jersey non-profit by visiting the Lisa's Light Foundation Facebook page.