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House Approves $50.7 Billion In Superstorm Aid

More than 10 weeks after Superstorm Sandy brutalized parts of the heavily populated Northeast, the House approved $50.7 billion in emergency relief for the victims Tuesday night as Republican leaders struggled to close out an episode that exposed painful party divisions inside Congress and out.

FULL COVERAGE: Sandy Aid Delay

House takes a vote on Sandy relief bill
House takes a vote on Sandy relief bill (CSPAN)

The vote was 241-180, and officials said the Senate was likely to accept the measure early next week and send it to President Barack Obama for his signature. Democrats supported the aid in large numbers, but there was substantial Republican backing, too, in the GOP-controlled House.

“We are not crying wolf here,” said Rep. Chris Smith, R-N.J., one of a group of Northeastern lawmakers from both parties who sought House passage of legislation roughly in line with what the Obama administration and governors of the affected states have sought.

No Disaster Double Standard

Rep. Frank LoBiondo (R)
Rep. Frank LoBiondo (R) (CSPAN)

Democrats were more politically pointed as they brushed back Southern conservatives who sought either to reduce the measure or offset part of its cost through spending cuts elsewhere in the budget.

“I just plead with my colleagues not to have a double standard,” said Rep. Carolyn Maloney of New York. “Not to vote tornado relief to Alabama, to Louisiana, to Mississippi, Missouri, to — with Ike, Gustav, Katrina, Rita — but when it comes to the Northeast, with the second worst storm in the history of our country, to delay, delay, delay.”

DOCUMENT: Read The Sandy Relief Bill

DOCUMENT: Read The Freylinghuysen Amendment

The  Freylinghuysen Amendment

Rep. Rodney Freylinghuysen (R)
Rep. Rodney Freylinghuysen (R) (CSPAN)

One key vote came on an attempt by Rep. Rodney Freylinghuysen to add $33.7 billion to an original allotment of $17 billion in aid. That vote was 228-192 and included heavy Democratic support.

Earlier, conservatives failed in an attempt to offset a part of the bill’s cost with across-the-board federal budget cuts. The vote was 258-162.

Rep. Mark Mulvaney, R-S.C., arguing for the reduction, said he wasn’t trying to torpedo the aid package, only to pay for it. “Are there no savings, are there no reductions we can put in place this year so these folks can get their money?” he asked plaintively.

Critics said the proposed cuts would crimp Pentagon spending as well as domestic accounts and said the aid should be approved without reductions elsewhere. “There are times when a disaster simply goes beyond our ability to budget. Hurricane Sandy is one of those times,” said Rep. Hal Rogers of Kentucky, chairman of the House Appropriations Committee.

By The Numbers

Rep. Jon Runyan (R)
Rep. Jon Runyan (R) (CSPAN)

The emerging House measure includes about $16 billion to repair transit systems in New York and New Jersey and a similar amount for housing and other needs in the affected area. An additional $5.4 billion would go to the Federal Emergency and Management Agency for disaster relief, and $2 billion is ticketed for restoration of highways damaged or destroyed in the storm.

Congress has already approved a $9.7 billion increase in a fund to pay federal flood insurance claims, much of it expected to benefit victims of Sandy.The political veered into the personal at times during hours of debate.

In remarks on the House floor, Rep. Bill Pascrell, D-N.J., said one South Carolina lawmaker who has criticized the measure “personally took a small business” disaster loan in the past. While he didn’t mention any names, South Carolina Rep. Mulvaney has said he received such a loan.

Mulvaney later told reporters the comparison was a poor one. He said that unlike funds in the Sandy legislation, the loan he received was approved within the budget, and not as an add-on that increased the deficit.

In the weeks since the storm hit, the Federal Emergency Management Agency has spent about $3.1 billion for construction of shelters, restoration of power and other immediate needs after the late-October storm pounded the Atlantic Coast with hurricane-force winds and coastal flooding.

Officials say Sandy is the most costly natural disaster since Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The storm damaged or destroyed 305,000 housing units in New York, and more than 265,000 businesses were disrupted there, officials have said. In New Jersey, more than 346,000 households were destroyed or damaged, and more than 40,000 families remain living out of their homes, according to officials.

(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved)

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