Legislation sponsored by Assembly Democrats Pamela Lampitt, Dan Benson and Troy Singleton allowing the New Jersey Community College Consortium for Workforce and Economic Development to request additional funding to provide basic skills training to displaced and disadvantaged workers has been signed into law.

            “With many New Jerseyans struggling to find work, this law provides training that helps disadvantaged and unemployed workers get the skills they need to get back to work," said Lampitt (D-Camden/Burlington). “I believe this common-sense measure is a critical part of jump-starting our economy, and that is why I am happy to see it signed into law.”

            The law allows the New Jersey Community College Consortium for Workforce and Economic Development, a central one-stop contact for statewide workforce training needs, to request additional funds from the “Supplemental Workforce Fund for Basic Skills” to provide basic skills training.

            The Workforce Consortium currently receives 13 percent of all the funds appropriated to the “Supplemental Workforce Fund for Basic Skills” to provide basic skills training to qualified displaced, disadvantaged or employed workers. Under the law, the Workforce Consortium will be able to request additional funds up to 25 percent of the total funds allocated for basic skills training.

            The law also allows employers to apply for a waiver from the requirement that they pay employees regular wages for the hours spent in the training offered by the Workforce Consortium.

             “With more eligible workers than jobs these days, many people are expanding their skill sets and looking beyond their professions in order to find work,” said Benson (D-Mercer/Middlesex). “This law will help residents actively looking for work learn the skills that will get them employed.”

            “In this tough economy, it’s slim pickings for New Jerseyans looking for work,” said Singleton (D-Burlington). “This law will allow more displaced and unemployed workers in New Jersey get the necessary training to better compete in the job market and rejoin the workforce.”